Sounding the Past: Music as History and Memory

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K. Kügle (ed.)


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This volume offers the first systematic exploration of the past as manifested in music of the later Middle Ages and the early modern period. It takes the reader on a journey of discovery across the continent, from the genesis of a new sense of a musical past in early thirteenth-century Paris to the complex and diverse roles and pedigrees given music of the past in sources, media, genres, communities, and regions in the Age of Reformations. Particular attention is given to the use of older styles and musical traditions in changing constructions of religious and political identity, laying the groundwork for a revised narrative of European music history that accommodates within its framework the full plurality of styles and regions found in the sources. The volume concludes with reflections on the conflicting appropriations and effects of the musical past today in composition, performance, musicological discourse, and tourism.

Contributors:
Karl Kügle( Utrecht University, University of Oxford), Susan Rankin (University of Cambridge), Adam Mathias (University of Cambridge), David Eben (Charles University Prague), Daniele V. Filippi (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis), Paweł Gancarczyk (Institute of Art, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw), Jan Ciglbauer (Charles University Prague), Emanuel Signer (University of Cambridge), Inga Mai Groote (Heidelberg University), Lenka Hlávková (Charles University Prague), Manon Louviot (Utrecht University), Christine Roth (University of Zurich), Bartłomiej Gembicki (Institute of Art, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw), Antonio Chemotti (Institute of Art, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw)

  • Dates
    Paru le 18 septembre 2020, Créé le 25 septembre 2020
  • Auteur(s)

    Karl Kügle is Professor of  the History of Music before 1800 at Utrecht University and a Senior Research Fellow in Music at Wadham College, University of Oxford.

  • Éditeur
    Brepols Publishers « Épitome musical »